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The mission of this program is to evaluate weed management practices to help Wisconsin growers sustainably control weeds and maximize the production of corn, soybean, small grains, and sweet corn crops. Through integration of applied field research and extension activities, we strive to deliver thorough, unbiased results to Wisconsin crop producers and improve upon the body of scientific weed science literature.

To read the complete blog, please visit the Out of Control page.

Scout your fields for weed seedlings this spring

Figure 1. A) Common lambsquarters, Chenopodium album; a soil sampler, one inch diameter, is in the foreground B) Horseweed (marestail), Conyza canadensis; C) Giant ragweed, Ambrosia trifida, with seed capsule attached; D) Giant ragweed seedlings.

Figure 1. A) Common lambsquarters; a soil sampler, one inch diameter, is in the foreground B) Horseweed (marestail); C) Giant ragweed, with seed capsule attached; D) Giant ragweed seedlings.

The fields may look cold, wet, and dormant this week but weeds were germinating in some fields in Janesville and Arlington last week. On April 17 at Janesville, common lambsquarters, giant ragweed, and horseweed were emerging (Fig. 1A-D). At Arlington in a plowed area, velvetleaf was emerging (Fig. 2). If you are leasing new land this year or want to get a head start on weed management, then scouting for weeds at the seedling stage before tillage can be a good way to assess density, the number of weeds in a given area, and for which weed species will likely be an issue around planting time. The Weedometer, developed by University of Wisconsin, can predict when weed species will likely be emerging for your location at http://weedecology.wisc.edu/weedometer/ . A guide to identifying the “Common Weed Seedlings of the North Central States” is available in pdf and print formats at Cooperative Extension’s Learning Store, or on the WCWS Weed info page.

Figure 2. Velvetleaf seedling.

Figure 2. Velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti, seedling.

UW Cooperative Extension Cover Crop Workgroup Website

What are the economic costs of cover crops? What are the environmental and economic benefits? How do the nutrients from cover crops cycle through the soil? What is The New York Times saying about cover crops? All of this information and much more can be found on the UW Cooperative Extension Cover Crop Workgroup website, where UWEX personnel across Extension programs and disciplines provide resources regarding cover crops which will be frequently updated.

Yahara Watershed Videos

Wisconsin’s Yahara Watershed encompasses lakes Mendota, Monona, Waubesa, Wingra, and Kegonsa, and also includes the Lakeshore Nature Preserve.The UW-Madison Water Sustainability and Climate project created the Water Walk video series to provide a virtual tour of this beautiful area as well as to show how human activities impact the quality of water in the watershed.

Common ragweed confirmed ALS inhibitor-resistant in Brown County Wisconsin

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Recently, Thomas Butts, a graduate research assistant, Vince Davis, and Dave Stoltenberg confirmed that a common ragweed population in Wisconsin is resistant to an ALS inhibitor. The full report is now available. For more information, please visit the WCWS documents page.

National Cover Crop Survey Seeks Farmers

Farmers are invited to complete this national online survey regarding their use of cover crops. This survey, conducted by the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) is used to collect data on the national use of cover crops and results will be released this summer in order to increase best management practices. Farmers who complete the survey are eligible for a drawing for one of two $100 Visa gift cards.

Help fight invasive species with the Wisconsin First Detector Network

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University of Wisconsin-Extension’s Mark Renz and Tony Summers will be offering online training to the public on invasive species identification. For more information about the Wisconsin First Detector Network, please read their press release below.

Invasive species are expanding throughout the state of Wisconsin each year. While these species are often overlooked, they are impacting our state’s economy, environment, and even human health. Wisconsin’s First Detector Network (WIFDN) was established in 2014 to train citizen scientists help prevent these impacts by looking for and reporting invasive species. In the inaugural year we trained over 100 people that contributed over 700 hours towards this effort.
In 2015 we are seeking additional members to train (existing members can participate for free). What does it take to become a WIFDN volunteer?
1. Passion for protecting Wisconsin from invasive species

2. Register for training videos/webinars ($30 registration fee, see below)

3. Volunteer 24 hours of service towards invasive species monitoring or education

Participants will receive detailed training on invasive species biology, impacts, and identification as well as the opportunity to participate in projects specifically designed for WIFDN members.
It all begins March 13th with the first of 5 biweekly webinars.
Click here to register for the 2015 WIFDN training. Registration is $30 and open until March 26, 2015. If you cannot afford the registration limited scholarships are available please contact us!
See our website for more details about WIFDN and the training session: fyi.uwex.edu/wifdn
Tony Summers, WIFDN Coordinator; PHONE: 608 262-9570; asummers2@wisc.edu